HCC Education Digital Library

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How can I submit content to the repository?
  2. Why is this called the 'Human-Centered Computing' (HCC) and not the 'Human-Computer Interaction' (HCI) digital library? What's the difference?
  3. What are the goals of the repository?
  4. How do you handle copyright issues?
  5. Who do I contact for more information?
  6. How is this project supported?
  7. Why is this different from the many other digital repository projects?
  8. Who is the intended audience?
  9. Who works on this project?
  10. What's with the search engine on your site? What do those images mean?

  1. How can I submit content to the repository?

    Use the online submission tool! If you are having problems with the tool, please email us so our team can correct the problem.

  2. Why is this called the 'Human-Centered Computing' (HCC) and not the 'Human-Computer Interaction' (HCI) digital library? What's the difference?

    Good question. Georgia Tech has a new doctoral program in Human-Centered Computing. The program's curriculum incorporates the learning, social and cognitive sciences and intelligent systems areas more closely with that of traditional HCI. This repository is intended to reflect that focus and thus support education in those areas as well as HCI.

  3. What are the goals of the repository?

    Our aim is to provide a collection of high quality learning objects that are highly relevant to those interested in the field of Human-Centered Computing, and provide mechanisms that encourage their access and use.

  4. How do you handle copyright issues?

    We have handled such issues on an ad hoc basis. We ask authors who have submitted materials to distribute their works under the Creative Commons licensing scheme. All current and future submissions will be covered under the 'Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike' version.

    When you submit materials, we assume that you hold (or have the appropriate permissions to distribute) the copyright on any materials you donate. If you find material in the repository to which you hold the copyright and which you would like removed, please send us an email. Likewise, just notify us if you'd like to have previously donated material removed for some reason.

  5. Who do I contact for more information?

    Email us with any questions, comments, criticism or suggestions. We'd love to hear from you! We are the Learning Technology Lab, led by Jim Foley; the HCC EDL project is led by Ph.D. student Edward Clarkson. The web lectures initiative has been headed by Ph.D. candidate Jason Day.

  6. How is this project supported?

    The HCC Education Digital Library is currently supported by the Stephen J. Fleming Chair in Telecommunications at the Georgia Tech College of Computing.

  7. Why is this different from the many other digital repository projects?

    We have several reasons for thinking this effort is both valuable and different from many other projects. Generally speaking, most digital repositories of educational material focus on broad areas of knowledge. They also tend to provide relatively simple and few mechanisms for browsing their contents. For example, a library might target content relevant to science education, and users may be able to browse through its contents alphabetically by author or through a hierarchy which divides science into a number of different fields and sub-fields.

    This approach has problems in higher education settings. First, students and teachers at that level are specialized enough that such general resources are not useful. Second, it is impractical for repositories with very broad subject domains to categorize materials at a specific enough level to be useful to such users. By limiting our project to HCC and HCI, we are able to provide materials useful for the advanced higher-education population and browsing mechansims may be more tailored to our specific domain.

  8. Who is the intended audience?

    Anyone with an interest in learning or teaching the field of Human-Centered Computing. We expect that this consists primarily of three broad groups:

    • Students, for self-study.
    • Teachers, for developing new curricula or improving current practice.
    • Professionals, for skill development.

    We believe we can leverage the expertise of institutions with larger HCI/HCC faculty (such as Georgia Tech) to benefit faculty especially at institutions without such expertise.

  9. Who works on this project?

    This project is the brainchild of Jim Foley, Stephen Fleming Chair of Telecommunications at Georgia Tech. The earliest versions of the site were created by Jason Day and Jonathan Woodbridge, graduate and undergraduate students respectively. In Fall 2004, Edward Clarkson joined the lab and took over the HCC EDL project, making it the focus of his Ph.D. dissertation research (which is ongoing). Since that time, Aarjav Trivedi, Kevin Yang, Andy Cox and Andy Wu have all contributed extensively to the project's technological infrastructure.

  10. What's with the search engine on your site? What do those images mean?

    You must be referring to search results like this. The picture at right on that page is a treemap, a visualization technique for hierarchical data. The image displays each document as a small box; documents that are in the same category get up in larger boxes together. For documents appearing in the search results, the boxes are colored according to their document type. Clicking on the small squares expands the search result listing to show its full details, including a thumbnail treemap that highlights only that particular document.

    We hope that this method of presenting search results will give users a better idea of how their results are distributed across the library contents as a whole. We also think that this display will make it easier for users to identify outlier search results, which tend to be very interesting or very uninteresting. What do you think? Tell us!

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Creative Commons License Unless noted otherwise, internally-linked contents are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.